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How to Use the Recipes in This Food

I have also included nutritional information for each recipe, listing the total calories along with the fat, protein, carbohydrate, and fiber counts in grams. You’ll find this information helpful as you fine-tune your personal keto targets for these macronutrients. If you’re wondering whether the recipes in this book are recipes that you can enjoy every day on your ketogenic diet, the answer is yes, most of them are. There are a few dishes, such as Brussels Sprouts with Soft-Boiled Eggs and Avocado (here), that I would eat only on special occasions.

The keto meters can help you decide when and how often to make certain recipes; dishes marked as High are everyday comfort foods to enjoy anytime, while dishes marked as Low should be reserved for holidays and other special occasions. Those recipes marked as Medium are generally for weekends or overfeeding days. Some recipes, such as Mashed Fauxtatoes (here), are higher in carbohydrates. This dish is still a great ketogenic comfort food, and it’s much lower in carbs than mashed potatoes, so I felt it was a great fit for this book.

Plus, many of my clients can have more carbs than others. I see very metabolically damaged clients in my practice, and in their case I limit carbohydrates to less than 20 to 30 grams a day. But I’ve also worked with athletes who can eat closer to 50 grams of carbs a day and remain in ketosis. This is where you and your testing come into play.

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Depending on your goals— remember, ketosis isn’t just about weight loss—you can determine which recipes to incorporate into your menus by using the keto meter at the top of each recipe. For more on testing, overfeeding, and other keto strategies, see my previous book, The 30-Day Ketogenic Cleanse.

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